Saturday, October 25 2014

CLG Releases Results of Latest Citizenship Survey


 CLG The Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG) released findings of its Citizenship Survey on Thursday, which covers the period from April to June 2010.

The release is divided in to three sections covering community action; community spirit; and prejudice and discrimination.

The findings of the survey include:

31 per cent of adults in England engaged in civic participation at least once in the last 12 months prior to interview – fewer than in any previous year of the survey. Civic participation “covers wider forms of engagement in democratic process, such as contacting an elected representative, taking part in a public demonstration or protest, or signing a petition.”

People from ethnic minority groups as a whole were more likely than White people to mix socially with people from different ethnic or religious backgrounds (96% compared with 79%), which can be attributed, according to the report, to whether the areas in which people live are ethnically diverse or relatively homogenous.

7 per cent of adults in England felt racial or religious harassment was a ‘very’ or ‘fairly’ big problem in their local area. People from ethnic minority backgrounds were more likely than White people to say that racial or religious harassment was a ‘very’ or ‘fairly’ big problem in their local area (12% compared with 6%).

45 per cent of people thought that there was more racial prejudice today than there was five years ago and 42 per cent of people thought that there was more religious prejudice today than there was five years ago.

22 per cent of people thought that they would be treated worse than people of other races by at least one of the eight public service organisations measured. These eight are the police, the prison service, the courts, the Crown Prosecution Service, the probation service, a council housing department or housing association, a local GP and a local school. Council housing departments or housing associations were most likely to be thought of as discriminating on the basis of race (17%).

People from ethnic minority backgrounds were more likely than White people to feel that they would be treated worse by at least one of the five criminal justice organisations (16% compared to 8%). The police are cited as being more discriminatory by people of an ethnic minority background than White (13% compared to 5%).

7% of people from ethnic minority backgrounds felt they had experienced labour market discrimination by being turned down for a job because of their race. This is compared to 1% of Whites.

The survey also highlights findings on peoples’ attitudes toward violent extremism, which it defines as “taking actions to cause injury or death to people in order to make a political protest.”
 
87 per cent of people rejected general violent extremism, which is measured through the question “How right or wrong do you think it is for people to use violent extremism in Britain to protest against things they think are very unfair or unjust?” This is an increase of 2% from previous findings from the DCLG that measured the period April-Dec 2009.

97 per cent rejected the use of violent extremism in the name of religion to protest or achieve a goal, which is again an increase of 2% from the same previous findings.

93 per cent of people rejected political campaigners writing and distributing leaflets that encouraged violence toward different ethnic groups – an increase of 1%.

83 per cent rejected using violence to protect animals – an increase of 2%.

You can read the full survey results here.








This content has been locked. You can no longer post any comment.
If you are experiencing problems please contact info@iengage.org.uk

Engage Publications



Books of Interest